Relationship 101, Uncategorized

Michael, will you marry me?

Queen Victoria, Halle Berry, Heather Mills (Paul McCartney’s ex), singer Pink, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Jennifer Hudson and most recently, Chrissy Lampkin (reality tv star) have all done it.

These women have said to hell with tradition or waiting on a man who may have been dragging his feet and proposed.

For those of you who didn’t know, it is not only Leap Day but is something called Sadie Hawkins Day – the day where it is accepted in many parts of the world for women to propose to men.

I know what you may be thinking when hearing about women who have to step up and take their relationships to this level- DESPERATE.

But is it really and why propose on a leap year/day?

Well, because leap is an anomoly. The fact that this day which is often considered “not a real day” is already such a variation from the norm, it makes this seemingly non-traditional action of women taking on the role meant for men acceptable.

I was curious on how this all began, and it seems to have started from one of several tales from way back when. I did a little digging and stumbled on one that says the proposals began like this:

The legend goes that St. Bridget of Ireland was frustrated that all the non-nun ladies in 5th century Ireland had to sit around waiting for proposals that might never come.

She complained about it to St. Patrick who, probably impressed by Bridget’s ability to turn her used bath water into beer, finally proclaimed that women could have the chance to propose themselves once every four years on the leap day. This became known as “The Ladies’ Privilege.”

As silly as it may sound, it stuck and the idea of a woman proposing seems to come around every leap year.

How the name Sadie Hawkins came to be was loosely based on the Irish version from what I can tell, but her version is a little more colorful which goes like this:

In Li’l Abner, Sadie Hawkins was the daughter of one of Dogpatch’s earliest settlers, Hekzebiah Hawkins. The “homeliest gal in all them hills”, she grew frantic waiting for suitors to come a-courtin’. When she reached the age of 35, still a spinster, her father was even more frantic—about Sadie living at home for the rest of her life. In desperation, he called together all the unmarried men of Dogpatch and declared it “Sadie Hawkins Day”.

Specifically, a foot race was decreed, with Sadie in hot pursuit of the town’s eligible bachelors—and matrimony as the consequence.

If a woman caught a bachelor and dragged him, kicking and screaming, across the finish line before sundown—by law he had to marry her!

Sadie Hawkins Day was first mentioned in the November 15, 1937 Li’l Abner daily strip


Now I wouldn’t exactly call “kicking and screaming” a joyous occasion for the groom to be, so a good old fashioned dinner with some candles and the ring surely comes across better.

At the end of the day, I’m sure women would much rather await the more traditional methods of a marriage proposal, but I’m okay with a variation.

Some men think that dating for 5 or 10 years is completely acceptable. They think that having one, two or three children together out of wedlock is fine because “you did it out of love”. Others feel as if sharing expenses, doing each others laundry and easing the tax load is just the same when shacking up as being married so why bother.

I say sometimes you have to take the bulls by the balls and lead him to the fence.

Ladies, you have less than 12 hours.

Until there’s a cure…

Carmen Jones

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